Archive for February, 2017

Bassheads & Car Audio Junkies: A Blabber From BitPusher

Posted in Uncategorized on February 4, 2017 by Q

boomers

See those discs above? These are what I felt like writing about. This is my statement (unwavering opinion) on what is SUPREME for your system.

Let me explain something, please follow if the subject of bass music is of interest to you.

I am as of this writing a 35 year old man. I knew the words to “Jam On It” by Newcleus when I was four years old. I have been obsessed with music (hiphop and electronica) literally my whole life. I wasn’t even in my double digits of age by the time I had shelves full of cassettes. Most kids ask or beg their parents for toys and things, but me? I was always begging and pleading with my mom for a new tape, although now and again I would ask for a video game. ANYWAY, my cousin and her husband used to babysit me alot, and they had a system in pretty much every vehicle they ever owned. Nothing competition like, in fact usually cheaper shit. Nonetheless, my obsession with hiphop and electronic music was nurtured strongly by them, and hearing my music bump so hard always gave me goosebumps.

Over the course of my pre-teen and teenage years, I don’t know. I would have to sit down and really think on this but as an estimate, I guarantee you I have owned over 100 different bass albums. Yes, pre-adult. I had stuff from everybody, including Pandisc Records, DM Records, Newtown Records, IBP Records, and on and on. I was extremely fond of playing my video games and just listening to those songs. That music always connected with me.

The point of this story? What is the best for your system? The younger generations probably don’t even know, though I hope so. You see, there are (I believe) in majority two types of bassheads:
Type one: the person who simply wants ‘loud.’ They want people to hear them coming down streets, and care little about the more technical side of things. Just loud and booming. Budget does not matter here, high grade or cheap, boom is their singlemost priority.
Type two: the purist, or the nerd. The types who drop big money into competition systems and compete fit here. But it’s not just them. Even those on a low budget, but care greatly about brand, about configuration, and complete/overall quality. They invest time in researching and are particular about many or all aspects of their system.

I consider myself type two. Still, one thing that anyone, no matter what their preferences and priorities are, want a fantastic experience. They want bass and is especially critical at such a personal depth for the basshead.

Now, to put all of this together, it is my declaration that the two CDs I have pictured above are the supreme discs you NEED to have to demonstrate the both quality and decibel crunching power of your system. NOTHING compares. Of all the ridiculous mountains of bass music I have owned and loved since my childhood, and including the many experiences I have gained over the years (from dicking around with my own or friends’ setups to having been a spectator at some actual competition shows), I can attest, again my personal opinion, nothing compares to these two discs. Younger generations who weren’t anywhere near being born when this stuff was being produced have probably heard nothing like the old bass music. But if they have, I’m glad for them. ANY decent system with ANY modern music can certainly slam. Monster systems can shake the air out of your lungs with just about anything. So people love going for modern hiphop, trap music, modern R&B, or any one of a couple dozen subgenres of electronic music to toss into their system and boom the hell out of it. Likewise, ANY bass CD will definitely push your setup nice and hard.

All I want to say is this; if you are any breed of basshead, car audio junkie and fanatic, etc, find a copy of Bass 305’s “Digital Bass” or Techmaster PEB’s “Bassgasm” and just listen. Sure, like most modern produced electronic music the entire production is completely and purely digital from top to bottom, just like these albums were. Digital composition, digital recording, digital processing, digital mastering. Yeppers. There is still something more to these albums though. Of all the bass music I have owned and heard and know from front to back, the sound quality and production of these two albums are simply unparalleled. I value these two CDs more than any music I own. My attachment to Bass 305 is extreme anyway, and perhaps my bias is present here since I had Digital Bass on cassette, and it was in my headphones often when skating around the neighborhood and so on.

I’m not all that talented of a musician myself and have limited capabilities, so I am not able to produce music of this quality and this composition. Believe me, you have no idea how badly I wish I had the equipment and such studios. But please at least take one second to consider my personal history here and then think why would this person make such a statement about these albums? He’s not a child, he’s been around a few years suffice it to say, so why does he hold such a strong opinion? Look, some nobody and his blog can’t really influence anyone to do jack shit, not to mention the likelihood that anyone targeted here would even see it or read it. Still, if you do, get those CDs. Yeah I had those cassettes, and later got them on CD not just because I loved them so much as a kid, but because as a pure basshead, I believe them to be absolutely essential for testing your setup, and for the listening experience they provide. I will repeat myself for the last time: these two CDs are the finest possible choice any basshead can make to demonstrate both the sound quality and raw power of their system. The absolute best of bass music. Just because you might not be the type who would casually listen to this kind of music like I do does not mean that they can’t serve you as a tool. Tune your system with these. Especially Bass 305. Absolutely gorgeous. DO IT RIGHT! Don’t download those albums as mp3s and expect gorgeous fidelity. If you really don’t know any better, understand that mp3 and similar compressed audio really do effect music in many negative ways, but make small files in return. Fortunate are the people who can’t hear the difference between an mp3 or iTunes aac vs a CD. When you get into higher-end equipment though, this begins to really matter, most of all with bass music since we’re talking about music with extremely low frequencies which take some real damage from the many processes involved with compressing audio into one of these “lossy formats.”

To all those who understand and live with the addiction I do; I love you guys. Bassheads for life.
–BitPusher